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Adoption attempt results in child custody case

The adoption procedure is typically difficult for those with a kid needing adoption placement and for those seeking a kid to take on. It is a procedure fulled of worry, doubt and uncertainty. A recent case could make such choices that much hard for Florida parents. In the case, a lady’s choice to put her baby daughter up for adoption resulted in a child custody dispute between a Native American people, the kid’s biological father and the adoptive moms and dads.

In the case, the biological mom, a member of a Native American people, put her child for adoption. In May, the adoptive family took a trip from their house state to the birth mom’s state to witness the kid’s adoption. The family returned house with the infant in June due to the adoptive father’s have to return to work. Ever since, the non-Native American biological father has sought legal custody.

Nevertheless, since the mom belongs to a Native American people, the adoption falls under federal law. The law, The Indian Child Well-being Act, specifies any child born to a tribal member should first be put with another member prior to being taken on by a non-Native American adoptive parent. Recently, a household law court awarded custody to the biological mother’s people, who stepped in.

While a lot of adoption cases do not include this level of problem, child custody is rarely a simple issue. While there seem to be numerous unknowns in this particular case, it is clear that it will likely result in additional litigation. Florida parents who feel they are entitled to kid custody also have the right to have their case heard in a court of household law. As constantly, it is important that all parties attempt to make decisions that are in the very best interest of the child.

Source: ABC Information, Okla. Custody Conflict Compared with SC Couple’s Case, Kristi Eaton, Sept. 13, 2013